Javascript Menu by Deluxe-Menu.com

Course 5T - Quiz 4

 

IMPORTANT — THIS QUIZ IS ONLY FOR VIEWING AND PRINTING ONLY.
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO TAKE YOUR QUIZ ON THIS PAGE.
RETURN TO YOUR HOME PAGE TO TAKE THE QUIZ.

Note: If you have a printer, you are welcome to print out this quiz.

 
1)
MOVING ON to Study Guide 4, 'Traumatic Grief in Military Children': When a Military parent is killed in combat, the grieving process for surviving Military children ________________.
 
is essentially the same as when a civilian parent has died in a car accident or other traumatic event.
is oftentimes complicated with personal and public issues which are unique to military service.
 
2)
What factors or unique circumstance(s) may complicate the grieving process of military children after a parent's death in combat?
 
Leaving their normal environment (residence in a military installation, their school, and friends) and their identity as 'military.'
Difficulty accepting the permanence of their loss because of past experience with the parent's extended deployments.
Exposure to unexpected and unwanted publicity and political intrusions into the family's mourning process.
All of the above.
 
3)
The children of deployed Reserve and National Guard personnel who are killed while on active duty may find that their grief is less understood by others around them, compared to children who live on military installations (military bases).
 
True False
 
4)
When a military adolescent's parent has been killed in combat, the youth's personal opinions and feelings about the war will effectively relieve their grief.
 
True False
 
5)
In military children and adolescents, the grief process is a form of clinical depression and, as such, requires medical or pharmacological treatment.
 
True False
 
6)
Table 1: Asking a lot of questions about how the parent died and about what death means are characteristic of children
 
with Traumatic Grief.
who are normally grieving.
 
7)
Table 1: Becoming withdrawn, hiding feelings (especially guilt), avoiding talk about the parent or places and/or things related to his or her death are often seen in military children
 
who are normally grieving.
experiencing traumatic grief.
 

 

All content on this site is Copyright (c) 2006-2017 by Pendragon Associates and/or CEU by Net

Web Analytics